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Chapmanville Regional High School Student Handbook
Mrs. Kathy Moore, Principal

MISSION STATEMENT

Chapmanville Regional High School is to provide a rigorous and relevant curriculum for all students in order to create productive citizens.

VISION STATEMENT
Chapmanville Regional High School envision our students actively engaged in the learning process, graduating with the skills needed to gain meaningful employment and becoming productive citizens in future society.

PHILISOPHY
The education aims of Chapmanville Regional High School are conceived as being part of a life-long process which should prepare students to make contributions to our democratic society; and to pursue excellence in their public and private lives.
We believe that the school has a responsibility to be aware of the needs of the community, to educate the students to become contributing members of the society, and to help students develop attitudes and skills needed for life in a world of rapidly increasing social, political, and economic change.
Positive attitudes and values must be fostered by the administration, teachers,

Table of Contents

• Enrollment Form
• School Directory
• High School Testing
• WESTEST 2 Online Writing Assessment
• WESTEST 2
• ACT WORKEYS
• AP Testing
• College Entrance Exams
• ACT PLAN
• PSAT
• ASVAB - Armed Service Vocational Aptitude Battery
• Accuplacer
• NAEP
• Athletics
• WVSSAC Eligibility Rule (127-2-6.1)
• NCAA Eligibility Requirements
• Panther - Tracks to Success (Scheduling Guide)
• Creating a Schedule
• College Transition Math
• College Transition English
• Class of 2016 Math Track
• Graduation Requirements - Class of 2016
• Graduation Requirements - Classes of 2012-2015
• Summer Assignments
• Work Based Learning
• Early Graduation
• Credit Recovery
• Early Release from School
• Weighted Grade Point Average
• Honors Courses
• AP - Advanced Placement Courses
• Withdrawal form Honors and AP Courses
• FAST TRACK Option and Post-Secondary Courses
• FAST TRACK and Dual Credit Course Offerings
• Dual Credit Classes
• Online College Courses (Virtual School)
• Schedule Change Policy
• ACT and Accuplacer Cut Scores
• Sample Schedules
• Professional Pathway
• Agriculture, Science and Natural Resources - Skilled Pathway
• Business and Marketing - Skilled Pathway
• Engineering and Technical - Skilled Pathway
• Fine Arts and Humanities - Skilled Pathway
• Course Descriptions
• Art
• Dance
• Drivers Education
• Health
• English
• Mathematics
• Miscellaneous Courses
• Music
• Physical Education
• Science
• Social Studies
• Theater
• World Languages
• Work Foundations
• Modified Diploma
• Career and Technical Programs
• Agriculture
• Army Junior Reserve Officer's Training Corps
• Automotive Technology
• Business/Marketing
• Carpentry
• Electrical Technology
• Electronics Technology
• Human Services - Event Planning
• Family Consumer Sciences - ProStart
• Graphic Design
• Health Science Education
• Welding
• Career Exploration (Pre-Vocational)

ENROLLMENT FORM

Name: ________________________________ Student I.D. Number: _________________________________

Parent/Guardian: _____________________________________ Grade Level Entering Fall:___________

STUDENT SCHEDULE
Semester 1 Semester 2
1 (English)
2 (Math)
3 (Science)
4 (Social Studies)
5. Advisor Advisee
6. (Core/Elective)
7. (Core/Elective)
8. (Elective)

Declared Pathway (Circle One): Skilled Professional

Declared Cluster and Concentration (Check One, Base on your Declared Pathway):
SKILLED PROFESSIONAL Alternative Electives
• Teaching
• Accounting
• JROTC
• Welding (Vo-Tech)
• Auto Body (Vo-Tech)
• Auto Collision (Vo-Tech)
• Computers (Vo-Tech)
• Graphics (Vo-Tech)
• Construction (Vo-Tech)
• Healthcare (Vo-Tech)
• HVAC (Vo-Tech)
• Electrical (Vo-Tech)
• Pro- Start, Cooking (Vo-Tech)
• Machine Tool (Vo-Tech)
• Industrial Equipment (Vo-Tech)
• Plant Systems • General/ Science
• Teaching
• Fine Arts
• Health
• Human Services List, in order of preference, what classes you would like to have if your 1st choice of electives is not available.

1. _________________________

2. _________________________

3. _________________________

We acknowledge that we have read the requirements for the courses requested, and understand the restrictions for and consequences of withdrawing from a course.

Student Signature: ________________________________________ Date: _______________

Parent Signature: _________________________________________ Date: _______________

It may seem overwhelming to consider now what your plans are for the coming year and beyond graduation. The pathway and cluster you choose now should be based on your interests. Below are a few guidelines to help you make your decisions:

PATHWAY: There are two pathways-Professional and Skilled.

The Professional pathway requires students to take courses that will prepare them to enter a four-year college following graduation. If you want to pursue a career which requires a four-year college degree or more, then this is the pathway you should choose.
The Skilled pathway is intended for students who plan to enter the workforce immediately after graduation, or after attending a two-year community college. Students in the skilled pathway must complete four required courses in their chosen concentration (see the section beginning on page 19).

CLUSTER: There are six Clusters. These are broad groupings of careers:
I. Science and Natural Resources•
II. Arts and Humanities•
III. Business and Marketing
IV. Engineering/Technical
V. Human Services •
VI. Health

Electives

• Eagles Nest (11th Grade ONLY & Approval of Karen Adkins)
• Leadership (12th Grade ONLY & Approval of Karen Adkins)
• ROTC
• Art
• Drivers Ed/ Crafts (11th & 12th Grade)
• Music
• Theater I, II, III, IV
• Theater Stage
• Chorus I, I, III, IV
• Vocal Ensemble
• Computers
• Spanish, I, II, & III
• College Psychology
• Psychology/ Sociology
• Band I, II, III, IV
• History of Rock
• Yearbook
• Library
• Astronomy (12th Grade)
• AP Geography
• Digital Imaging
• Computer Graphics
• AP World

Administrator Title Email

Kathy Moore Principal kimoore@k12.wv.us
Assistant Principals
Paula Thomas pathomas@k12.wv.us
Eric Ellis erellis@k12.wv.us
Jill Barker jillbarker@k12.wv.us

Counselor Title Email
Name: Fonda Adkins Name: Karen Varney
Counselorfdadkins@k12.wv.us Counselorklvarney@k12.wv.us


Department Chair Email

• English Tia Miller tdmiller@k12.wv.us
• History Shane Bryant tsbryant@k12.wv.us
• Math Janet Hanshaw jhanshaw@k12.wv.us
• Science Geoff Saunders gsaunders@k12.wv.us
• Related Arts Julie Alderman jalderman@k12.wv.us

Note: Department Chairs are listed as a resource for parents or students who may have questions about specific courses.

Tardy Policy

Anytime a student is tardy for school or class, they will automatically serve a day in lunch detention, effective the day of tardy. If the tardy occurs after lunch, the student will serve detention the following day. Multiple tardies will result in multiple days of detention. If tardiness becomes a problem, the student will face more severe penalties, such as Thursday School or out of school suspension.
If a student skips detention, they will then serve a Thursday School. If they skip Thursday School, they will serve out of school suspension. Eric Ellis, Assistant Principal

Sign-Out Policy

In order for students to sign out, the parent/guardian, or someone designated by the parent/guardian, must come in and sign them out by a school official. NO STUDENT shall sign themselves out.
If the parent calls, and it is an EMERGENCY, it will be taken into consideration by administration for students who drive to be excused. Eric Ellis, Assistant Principal

Personal Electronics Policy

In order to protect classroom instructional time and ensure CRHS students are provided a high quality educational experience the following zero tolerance policy is enacted.
Personal electronic devices (cell phones, iPods, iPads, personal computer, MP3 player's electronics not named above) shall not be used in any way during instructional time unless otherwise authorized by a teacher as an instructional aid. Students are expected to respect their teachers during instructional time by not engaging in the use of personal electronics in any manner. Students choosing this behavior shall be considered insubordinate and disrupting the educational process of the classroom.

Consequences for violating this policy:
• Inside the classroom (bell to bell)
• First Offense: Automatic one day Thursday School
• Second Offense: Automatic one day suspension
• Third Offense: Automatic three day suspension with referral to court system for habitual violation of school rules/policies.

Students are allowed to use electronic devices before/after school, and lunch time in designated areas only.
Students using any electronic devices to record incidences or events at school will be addressed in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct and WV Code. Also, this behavior may be considered a violation of someone's civil rights.
Policy in effect beginning 2011-2012 school year.

• Junior/Senior Prom Policy
• National Honor Society Policy
• Missing/Late Assignment Policy
• No Tolerance Bullying Policy

WESTEST 2 ONLINE WRITING ASSESSMENT

The WESTEST 2 Online Writing Assessment, given to students in grades nine through eleven, is a customization of CTB/McGraw- Hill's online writing assessment program.

Students are required to write an essay in response to a given prompt based on either the descriptive, narrative, expository or persuasive types of writing. Prompts are randomly assigned. Students have the option of composing handwritten rough drafts before entering their essays online. The assessment is not timed. Students will be given the time needed to complete the assessment within the confines of the testing session, but examiners will end tests for students who have stopped working for more than ten minutes and have not submitted their essays.

Student essays will be computer scored, using the West Virginia Six-Point Rubric. The computer will assign a score in the criteria areas of Organization, Development, Sentence Structure, Word Choice and Mechanics and assign a Summative Score and Performance Level. A Summative Score is the total of these individual scores. The Performance Level indicates the level at which the student can consistently perform. Student, school, county and state score reports will be generated by CTB/McGraw- Hill and reviewed by the West Virginia Department of Education. These reports will be available by the end of the school year.

WESTEST 2

As mandated by the West Virginia Board of Education, all students participate in the state-county testing program. The WESTEST is administered to determine the achievement levels of students in grades 9-11. The testing results are used to assist in educational decisions related to curriculum, career planning, and recommendations for class placement for students. Students' reading/language arts score is derived from: A.) the Online Writing assessment and B.) The written portion of the WESTEST 2 for reading/language arts.

ACT WORKKEYS

WorkKeys is part of the West Virginia assessment program. It is administered each spring to all students who are completing a Career Technical Education (CTE) major. The WorkKeys assessment is a product of the ACT Corporation, which also produces the eighth grade EXPLORE, the tenth grade PLAN, and the ACT college admissions exam. WorkKeys is a battery of tests administered over two or three days. The tests given to West Virginia CTE completers are the following: Reading for Information, Locating Information, and Applied Mathematics. Students who perform well on all three tests receive a nationally recognized certificate. Based on their level of proficiency, students receive a Bronze, Silver, or Gold certificate.

THE ACT PLAN ASSESSMENT

The PLAN® program helps 10th graders build a solid foundation for future academic and career success and provides information needed to address school districts' high-priority issues. It is a comprehensive guidance resource that helps students measure their current academic development, explore career/ training options, and make plans for the remaining years of high school and post-graduation years. PLAN can help all students-those who are college-bound as well as those who are likely to enter the workforce directly after high school.

As a "pre-ACT" test, PLAN is a powerful predictor of success on the ACT. At the same time, many schools recognize the importance of PLAN testing for all students, as it focuses attention on both career preparation and improving academic achievement. (www.act.org)

The Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) is a program co- sponsored by the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC). It is a standardized test that provides firsthand practice for the SAT®. It also gives you a chance to enter NMSC scholarship programs and gain access to college and career planning tools.

The PSAT/NMSQT measures the following:
• Critical reading skills
• Math problem-solving skills
• Writing skills

You have developed these skills over many years, both in and out of school. This test doesn't require you to recall specific facts from your classes.

The most common reasons for taking the PSAT/NMSQT are the following:
● Receive feedback on your strengths and weaknesses on skills necessary for college study. You can then focus your preparation on those areas that could most benefit from additional study or practice.
● See how your performance on an admissions test might compare with that of others applying to college.
● Enter the competition for scholarships from National Merit Scholarship Corporation (grade 11).
● Help prepare for the SAT. You can become familiar with the kinds of questions and the exact directions you will see on the SAT.
● Receive information from colleges when you check "yes" to Student Search Service.

ARMED SERVICES VOCATIONAL APTITUDE BATTERY (ASVAB)

The aptitude test is administered by representatives of the Armed Services. It is an optional test but is recommended to students to help give them an idea of their strengths and weaknesses in the aptitude for certain careers.

Accuplacer is Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College's approved placement test to assess your skills in English, Mathematics and Study Skills. Students are only permitted to register for English and Mathematics courses at the level indicated by your Accuplacer, ACT or SAT or other approved test scores. Students must take the Accuplacer or ACT prior to enrolling in a dual credit or Fast Track course. Students not receiving a high enough score on the Accuplacer or ACT may not be allowed to enroll in a dual credit and/or Fast Track course. Cut off scores for placement in English, Mathematics, and Science based on Accuplacer or ACT scores can be found on page 19.

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is the largest nationally representative and continuing assessment of what America's students know and can do in various subject areas. Assessments are conducted in mathematics, reading, science, writing, the arts, civics, economics, geography, and U.S. history.
Since NAEP assessments are administered uniformly using the same sets of test booklets across the nation, NAEP results serve as a common metric for all states and selected urban districts. The assessment stays essentially the same from year to year, with only carefully documented changes. This permits NAEP to provide a clear picture of student academic progress over time.

In order to participate in extracurricular athletic activities students must meet all state and local attendance requirements as well as maintain a 2.0 grade point average. Eligibility is determined for each semester based on the students GPA from the previous semester. Computing eligibility is based on the following grade computations: A=4 points, B= 3 points, C=2 points, D =1 point and an F is awarded 0 points. However, it should be noted that block courses and all year courses are computed differently. All- year courses receive half the value of the points earned for each semester and block courses receive the full value. Additionally, in order to participate in athletics, a student must be enrolled in the "equivalent of 20 periods or four subjects per week," that will count toward graduation from high school. Reference: WVSSAC, 126-26-3, 3.1.

Further information may be found at the West Virginia Secondary Schools Athletic Commission Website: http://www.wvssac.org.

For students who are interested in learning about the NCAA recruiting process or registering with the NCAA Clearinghouse for athletic purposes, they need to log in to eligibilitycenter.org. And create an account. For additional information about the NCAA as an organization, history, purpose, etc., the main website is www.NCAA.com. While these websites are linked it is difficult to navigate out of the NCAA. com to the eligibilitycenter.org.
Please note: NCAA may not recognize a failing grade recovered through Logan County's credit recovery program. In this case, it may be best for the student to retake the course and replace the failing grade.

Pathway Skilled--if you are going on for further training and education after high school. Professional--if you are planning to go to four years of college after high school.

• Math

• 4 credits:
• Math I or Math I with Support
• Math II
• Conceptual Math
• Algebra II
• Class of 2016: See previous page 4 credits:
• Math I or Math I with Support
• Algebra II or Algebra III/SWVCTC Math 123/MT130
• Trigonometry and/or Pre-Calculus/Transition Math Additional Courses:
• AP Calculus AB; AP Calculus BC
• Class of 2016: See previous page

• Science

• 3 credits:
• Physical Science
• Biology
• Chemistry/Biology II/Earth Science 4 credits:
• Physical Science
• Biology
• Chemistry
• Plus one addition lab science: Physics
• Earth Science
• Human Anatomy & Physiology
• Additional Courses:
• AP Physics; AP Chemistry; AP Biology; AP Environmental Science

1. English

• 4 credits:
• English 9
• English10
• English11
• English12 4 credits:
• English 9
• English10
• English11 or AP English Language
• English12 or AP English Literature
• SWVCTC English 101/102

2. Social

• Studies
• 4 credits:
• World to 1900
• U.S. History to 1900
• 20th/21st Century
• Civics/Government 4 credits:
• World to 1900
• U.S. History to 1900
• 20th/21st Century or AP U.S. History
• Civics

o Other 4 required courses related to the selected concentration. 2 credits in the same foreign language
o 1 credit related to the selected career concentration
 Additional
 Requirements: Twenty-four (25) credits to graduate
 One Fine Arts credit
 High School Physical Education (1 credit)
 High School Health (1 credit)
 Three (3) hours of work based learning Twenty-four (24) credits to graduate
 One Fine Arts credit
 High School Physical Education (1 credit)
 High School Health (1 credit)
 Three (3) hours of work based learning

 Must have 20 hours of community service

Pathway Skilled--if you are going on for further training and education after high school. Professional--if you are planning to go to four years of college after high school.

Math

• 4 credits:
• Algebra I or Algebra I w/Algebra I
• Support
Math II
• Conceptual Math
• College Transition Math or Algebra II 4 credits:
• Algebra I or Algebra I w/Algebra I Support
Math II
• Algebra II or Algebra III/SWVCTC Math 123/MT130
• Trigonometry and/or Pre-Calculus Honors/ Transition Math Additional Courses:
• AP Calculus AB; AP Calculus BC;

Science-3 credits:
• Physical Science
• Biology
• Chemistry/Biology II/Earth Science 4 credits:
• Physical Science
• Biology
• Chemistry
• Plus one addition lab science:
• Physics
• Earth Science
• Human Anatomy & Physiology
• Additional Courses:
• AP Physics; AP Chemistry; AP Biology; AP Environmental Science

English-4 credits:

• English 9
• English10
• English11
• English12 4 credits:
• English 9
• English10
• English11 or AP English Language
• English12 or AP English Literature
• SWVCTC English 101/102

Social Studies
• 4 credits:
• World to 1900
• U.S. History to 1900
• 20th/21st Century
• Civics/Government 4 credits:
• World to 1900
• U.S. History to 1900
• 20th/21st Century or AP U.S. History Civics/Government or AP Civics

Other 4 required courses related to the selected concentration. 2 credits in the same foreign language

1 credit related to the selected career concentration

Additional Requirements: Twenty-four (24) credits to graduate
• One Fine Arts credit
• High School Physical Education (1 credit)
• High School Health (1 credit)
• Three (3) hours of work based learning Twenty-four (24) credits to graduate
• One Fine Arts credit
• High School Physical Education (1 credit)
• High School Health (1 credit)
• Three (3) hours of work based learning
• Must have 20 hours of community service.

The Credit Recovery Program at Logan County High School is intended to help CRHS students recover credit as a result of failed coursework. This program is available ONLY to students who have earned failing grades or have received no credit in courses taken at Chapmanville Regional High School. Credit recovery will be offered as an after school program. See your counselor to sign up.

Students eligible for credit recovery are to abide by all conditions set forth by the Credit Recovery Program. There will be NO disciplinary problems and no attendance problems noted by the instructor or the student will be automatically removed from the program and will not be given this opportunity again. Once enrolled in Credit Recovery, the class must be completed.

Logan County Board of Education Attendance Policy states:
All students in grades 9-12, in order to obtain the full benefit from the educational programs offered, shall be scheduled in the defined high school curriculum, college courses, career/technical programs or virtual school courses for the full instructional day for four (4) years except for compelling circumstances approved by the Board.

The weighted grade point system applies to class rank only. It will be reflected only in the student's semester and cumulative grade point averages. It will not be used to determine honor roll at each six- week period, and will not be used for determining extra-curricular activity eligibility. The regular 4.0 scale will be used for honor roll and eligibility. All standard classes carry the regular weight of A=4 points, B=3 points, C=2 points, D=1 point, and F=0 points. Those courses designated as "AP" will have the weighted value of A=5 points, B=4 points, C=3 points, D=2 points, and F=0 points. The purpose of the higher weighting is to encourage students to take the more difficult courses and be able to maintain high class ranking even though their grade may be less than an "A." Advanced Placement Courses are identified within the course listings, using words such as "AP" within the course description.

Purpose of Honors Courses: The purpose of an honors course is to challenge students to excel in specific disciplines above and beyond the expectations of the average classroom. Honors classes are expected to be rigorous. The level of difficulty will be appropriate to the course and grade level. In light of this, all honors level courses work on a 90-100 grading scale. They are not weighted. In addition, the expected outcome of an honors curriculum is to better prepare students to perform on college entrance exams and be better prepared for the rigor required in the succeeding Advanced Placement course, where those courses exist.
Fundamental Understandings:
• Honors level courses differ from regular courses in that they treat content with greater in-depth study, contain research, give evidence of requiring critical thinking and contain extended course content.
• Honors level courses must have established prerequisites indicating completed courses and academic standing.
• Honors level courses are designed with the rigor of Advanced Placement courses in mind.
• Honors courses are offered in several departments.
• The selection of courses is a critical choice for students, and is always accomplished in consultation with parents.
• Honors courses are graded on a 93-100 grading scale.
Enrollment Requirements:
Students will be enrolled in honors level courses based on the following criteria:
Ø WESTEST 2 Scores which show Above Mastery or Distinguished in reading/language arts, mathematics, science, and/or social studies
AND / OR
Ø ACT EXPLORE scores that show the student is academically on track for college level courses.
•English=13 or higher
•Mathematics=17 or higher
•Reading=15 or higher
•Science=20 or higher
Ø Current teacher recommendation
Ø Parent request via a written letter to the student's counselor

Advanced Placement Courses offer our students the opportunity to do college level work while still in high school. They are available to qualified, academically-oriented students in grades nine through twelve as noted. Upon completion of the AP course, students must take the nationally administered examination offered in early May, which the district provides at no expense. Some colleges offer course credit in exchange for a passing score on an AP Exam. This makes it possible for a student who is successful on the exam(s) and in the course(s) to enter college at or near the sophomore level. The examination contains a multiple choice section and an essay section. They take about 3-4 hours to complete. The best way to describe them is "tough but fair." Every examination receives an overall grade on a five-point scale: 5 - extremely well qualified, 4 - well qualified, 3 - qualified, 2 - possibly qualified, 1 - no recommendation.

Reasons to take an AP course:
• You are ready for a unique learning experience that will help you succeed in college.
• Through AP's college-level courses and exams, you can earn college credit and advanced placement. You can stand out in the admission process.
• You can learn from some of the most skilled, dedicated, and inspiring teachers in the world.
In order to receive college credit, a student generally needs to score three or higher on the examinations. A student should check at the college(s) they may be attending to check on their policy of accepting college credit from the AP exams. For a list of colleges that accept AP credit, students should see their counselor. An AP Grade Report is sent in early July to each student, school, and if requested, to the college(s) you select. It must be kept in mind that completion of the AP courses(s) does not insure the student a passing grade on the examinations(s). It depends on the dedication and quality of work performed by the student. Advanced Placement courses are graded on a weighted scale, with an A=5 quality points, B=4, and so forth. Advanced Placement courses are offered in the following areas: Social Studies, Science, English, and Mathematics.

The master schedule is based on the number of students requesting a course. For this reason, students will not be able to withdraw from honors level classes after enrollment is completed. Please refer to the previous section for the expectations of "Honors" and "AP" level classes and choose these classes carefully. Many of the honors level classes require summer reading assignments. Students will not be permitted to withdraw from an honors level or Advanced Placement (AP) course.

Dual credit classes allow students to earn college credit while enrolled in a high school course. Dual credit courses provide students the opportunity to earn credit both from their high school and Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College. These are advanced level, elective courses. Students enrolling in these classes must apply to SWVCTC, pay an admission fee, have a 3.0 cumulative grade point average on the day of enrollment, and meet any other prerequisites determined by SWVCTC or the high school.

Dual credit courses can provide students with the opportunity to earn more than a semester of college credit while in high school. Students who plan to attend a different college than Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College should understand that it is their responsibility to check that college's admission requirements to ensure that dual credit courses will transfer, either as required or elective courses.

Students' grades for their high school transcript will be based on the county's grading scale. Grades for the students' college transcript will be based on Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College's grading scale. Dual credit courses are weighted.
Please Note: Staffing for the high school courses will receive priority before college classes. Typically, a minimum of 10 students must be enrolled in the class before it will be offered.

The school administration determines the number of sections of each subject to be taught and the number of teachers needed in each discipline based on student requests. In light of teacher cutbacks, classes will be full. Regretfully, the flexibility to make changes later is impaired. Therefore, choose courses and alternate courses carefully.

THE MASTER SCHEDULE of course offerings are developed based on student needs and requests and the staffing provided. Therefore, it is very important that students and parents carefully study the course offerings and choose those that will best meet their needs.
ALTERNATE COURSES must be listed in case of scheduling conflicts. If too few students request a course, it may not be offered and an alternate course will be selected. If students do not select alternates prior to the scheduling process, they will be placed in alternates chosen by their counselor.
COURSE AVAILABILITY is dependent upon a preferred class size of at least (22) students in most courses. Courses with fewer than (22) students may not be offered. Staff availability may necessitate these classes not being offered.
NO SCHEDULE CHANGES will take place after the 5th day of the start of school.

CT Placement Guidelines

EN 090 EN099 EN101/102 MT 090 MT 095 AND MT096 MT 123 MT 130 CH213/214 COLLEGE LEVEL
READING below 17 17 or above * 17 or above
VERBAL (ENGLISH) Below 18 18 or above* 18 or above
MATH below 16 Below 19 19 -22 23 or above 19 or above 19 or above**

ACCUPLACER Placement Guidelines
EN 090 EN099 EN101 MT 090 MT 095 AND MT 096 MT 123 MT 130 CH213/214 COLLEGE LEVEL
READING COMPREHENSION below 79 79 or above * 79 or above
SENTENCE SKILLS below 88 88 or above* 88 or above
ARITHMETIC below 85 85 or above 85 or above **
ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA below 84 84 or above 84 or above **

* Students must complete both EN090 and EN 099, if required before registering for EN 101. They can take both courses during the same semester

** Students must complete MT 090, if required, before registering for the MT 095 and MT 096 sequence, and they must first complete MT 095 and then MT 096 before registering for college-level mathematics courses.

Professional Pathway: General (Science)

YEAR ONE YEAR TWO YEAR THREE YEAR FOUR
English 9 English 10 English 11 English 12
Math I Math II Math III Math IV
World History US to 1900 20/21st Century or
AP US History Civics
Physical Science Biology Earth Science/Chemistry/ Biology II Physics/Earth Science/Human Anatomy/ Chemistry
Fine Art Elective
P.E. or JROTC Health Elective
Spanish I Spanish II Elective

Professional Pathway: Health
YEAR ONE YEAR TWO YEAR THREE YEAR FOUR
English 9 English 10 English 11 English 12
Math I Math II Math III Math IV
World History US to 1900 20/21st Century or
AP US History Civics
Physical Science Biology Chemistry Human Anatomy
Fine Art Elective Healthcare Fundamentals Elective
P.E. or JROTC Health Business Computers Elective
Spanish I Spanish II Elective

Professional Pathway: Human Services

YEAR ONE YEAR TWO YEAR THREE YEAR FOUR
English 9 English 10 English 11 English 12
Math I Math II Math III Math IV
World History US to 1900 20/21st Century or
AP US History Civics
Physical Science Biology II Physics /Earth Science/Human Anatomy/ Chemistry
Fine Art Elective
P.E. or JROTC Health Elective
Spanish I Spanish II Elective

Professional Pathway: Fine Arts (Must take the same type of art each year)
YEAR ONE YEAR TWO YEAR THREE YEAR FOUR
English 9 English 10 English 11 English 12
Math I Math II Math III Math IV
World History US to 1900 20/21st Century or
AP US History Civics
Physical Science Biology Earth Science/Chemistry/ Biology II Physics/Earth Science/Human Anatomy/ Chemistry/ Biology II
Fine Art Fine Art Fine Art Fine Art
P.E. or JROTC Health Elective
Spanish I Spanish II Elective

Professional Pathway: Accounting
YEAR ONE YEAR TWO YEAR THREE YEAR FOUR
English 9 English 10 English 11 English 12
Math I Math II Math III Math IV
World History US to 1900 20/21st Century or
AP US History Civics
Physical Science Biology Earth Science/Chemistry/Biology II Physics/Earth Science/Human Anatomy/ Chemistry/Biology II
Fine Art Elective Accounting I Accounting II
P.E. or JROTC Health Business Computers BE-INTR-BM
Spanish I Spanish II Elective

Professional Pathway: JROTC
YEAR ONE YEAR TWO YEAR THREE YEAR FOUR
English 9 English 10 English 11 English 12
Math I Math II Math III Math IV
World History US to 1900 20/21st Century or
AP US History Civics
Physical Science Biology Earth Science/Chemistry/ Biology II Physics/Earth Science/Human Anatomy/ Chemistry/ Biology II
JROTC I JROTC II JROTC III JROTC IV
Fine Art Elective
Spanish I Spanish II Elective

Professional Pathway: Teaching
YEAR ONE YEAR TWO YEAR THREE YEAR FOUR
English 9 English 10 English 11 English 12
Math I Math II Math III Math IV
World History US to 1900 20/21st Century or
AP US History Civics
Physical Science Biology/Honors Biology Earth Science/Chemistry Physics/Earth Science/Human Anatomy/ Chemistry
Fine Art Elective Teacher Prep Student Learning
P.E. or JROTC Health Foundations in Edu Educational Psych
Spanish I Spanish II Elective

Skilled Pathway: Teaching
YEAR ONE YEAR TWO YEAR THREE YEAR FOUR
English 9 English 10 English 11 English 12
Math I Math II Math III Math IV
World History US to 1900 20/21st Century Civics
Physical Science Biology Earth Science Elective
Fine Art Elective Teacher Prep Student Learning
P.E. or JROTC Health Foundations in Edu Educational Psych
Elective

Skilled Pathway: Accounting
YEAR ONE YEAR TWO YEAR THREE YEAR FOUR
English 9 English 10 English 11 English 12
Math I Math II Math III Math IV
World History US to 1900 20/21st Century Civics
Physical Science Biology Earth Science Elective
Fine Art Elective Accounting I Accounting II
P.E. or JROTC Health Business Computers BE-INTR-BM
Elective

Skilled Pathway: JROTC
YEAR ONE YEAR TWO YEAR THREE YEAR FOUR
English 9 English 10 English 11 English 12
Math I Math II Math III Math IV
World History US to 1900 20/21st Century or
AP US History Civics
Physical Science Biology Earth Science/Chemistry/Biology II Physics/Earth Science/Human Anatomy/ Chemistry
Fine Art Elective JROTC III JROTC IV
JROTC I Education JROTC II Elective
Elective

All Vocational Programs- Skilled Pathway:
Pro-Start (Cooking), Electrical, Welding, Machine Tool, Computers, Plant Systems, Healthcare, Auto Collision, Graphics, Construction, Heating & Cooling (HVAC), Industrial Equipment, & Auto Body
YEAR ONE YEAR TWO YEAR THREE YEAR FOUR
English 9 English 10 English 11 English 12
Math I Math II Math III Math IV
World History US to 1900 20/21st Century Civics
Physical Science Biology Earth Science Vo-Tech
Fine Art Elective Vo-Tech
P.E. or JROTC Health Vo-Tech
Elective Vo-Tech
Chapmanville Regional High School
Course Catalog for
School Year 2013-2014
** SPECIAL NOTICE **
The school administration determines the number of sections of each subject to be taught and the number of teachers needed in each discipline based on student requests. Classes will be full. Regretfully, the flexibility to make changes later is impaired. Therefore, choose courses and alternate courses carefully.
THE MASTER SCHEDULE of course offerings is developed based on student needs and requests and the staffing provided. Therefore, it is very important that students and parents carefully study the course offerings and choose those that will best meet their needs.
COURSE AVAILABILITY is dependent upon a preferred class size of at least (22) students in most courses. Courses with fewer than (22) students may not be offered. Staff availability may necessitate these classes not being offered.
NO SCHEDULE CHANGES will take place after the 5th day of the start of school or change at the semester. Only special circumstances, and with the approval of the principal, will warrant any class change.  
ART
Art education courses are a place where students can cultivate creativity and individuality. Creative thinking, problem solving, craftsmanship and a respect for process are emphasized. All students must have one credit of fine arts to meet graduation requirements.

ART I (GRADES 9-12)
3211
This is an introduction to the visual arts. Students will explore a wide variety of projects which may include, but not limited to, drawing, painting, printmaking and 3-dimensional media, while learning basic art skills, techniques, principles, and elements of design.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

ART II (GRADES 9-12)
3212
This course is a continuation of Art I, with exploration and an in-depth study of additional media. Students will develop creative thinking and problem solving skills.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Art I

ART III (GRADES 10-12)
3213
This course involves the study of techniques and skills necessary for success in advanced problems and projects. In this course students may begin to choose an area of specialization.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Art II

ART IV (GRADES 10-12)
3214
This course is a specialized visual art class. It will consist of advanced problems in the elements and principles of design with an emphasis on refining skills and student specializations. Students will be required to compile a portfolio of individual work and present an exhibit.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Art III

DRIVER EDUCATION

(GRADES 9-12)
This is a one (1) semester course open first semester to students who will have reached age sixteen (16) by the last scheduled date of the course first semester; and second semester to students who will have reached age sixteen (16) by the last scheduled date of the course second semester. Seniors receive preference in this course.
Credit: 0.5
Duration: One Semester
Prerequisites: Must have no more than five (5) unexcused absences the prior year.

This course consists of fifty (50) hours of classroom instruction; and ten hours of in-car observation and six hours of behind the wheel laboratory instruction. The Driver Education course develops the knowledge, attitudes, habits and skills necessary for the safe operation of motor vehicles. For a student to receive a "West Virginia High School Driver Education Certificate" at the end of the semester, the following criteria must be met: (1) The student must achieve a standard grade of "C" (75%) in both the classroom phase and the laboratory phase; (2) The student must meet the required number of hours for the classroom and laboratory phase. Due to the high number of course requests those failing may not retake the course.

HEALTH
One full credit of health is required for graduation. No other course may be substituted for the Health course.

HEALTH (GR. 10)
6909
In this course students will develop knowledge, attitudes, values, and skills concerning issues of particular concern during adolescence which impact on personal health and wellness. Topics in these areas include: Mental and Emotional Health; Family Life; Personal Health and Fitness; Sexuality; Substance Use Prevention; Disease Prevention and Control; Injury Prevention and Safety; Community Health; Consumer Health; and Environmental Health.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS

ENGLISH 9 (GRADE 9)
4009
This is an integrated study of the language arts, including literature, grammar, usage, mechanics, and composition designed for high school freshmen with an emphasis on grammar and the writing process.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None
ENGLISH 9 SUPPORT (GRADE 9)
4127

ENGLISH 10 (GRADE 10)
4010
This is an integrated study of language arts, including literature, grammar, usage, mechanics, and composition designed for high school sophomores with an emphasis on the forms of literature. Students will complete a research project.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

HONORS ENGLISH 10 (GRADE 10 - PRE-AP)
4010
This honors course offers ambitious students the opportunity to encounter advanced work in preparation for taking AP courses in their junior and senior year. Though students taking this class are not required to take AP courses in future years, it is generally expected that they will continue in that sequence. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of both fiction and nonfiction. Students will consider a work's structure, style, and themes as well as the author's use of language. Summer reading/writing assignments are required, and it is the responsibility of the student to obtain access to any texts that may be needed. Texts can be obtained through the public library, Amazon.com, or local bookstores.

Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: A "B" or higher in English 9 in addition to a teacher recommendation

ENGLISH 11 (GRADE 11)
4011
This one-year course (Composition and Themes in American Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Common Core State Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course requires expository, analytical, and argumentative writing assignments that are based on readings representing a wide variety of prose styles and genres. The course is also structured around multicultural themes and perspectives found in literary, non-fiction, and expository texts by American authors to encourage students to think conceptually about the American past, present, and future as well as about the ethnic and cultural diversity of the American experience. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. All students are required to complete research papers and projects. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION
(Can replace English 11)
4041
This Advanced Placement course offers ambitious students the opportunity to encounter college level work before graduation from high school. Its primary purpose is to prepare students for entry into Freshmen level college English courses, though a passing score on the Advanced Placement Test for Language and Composition can earn a student college credit depending on the requirements of the individual college. The course includes close reading and analysis of non-fiction prose as well as the study of the process of writing, including research and argumentative writing. Both the reading and writing should make students aware of author's purpose, audience needs, rhetorical modes, and the resources of language such as syntax, diction, and tone. Summer reading/writing assignments are required, and it is the responsibility of the student to obtain access to any texts that may be needed. Texts can be obtained through the public library, Amazon.com, or local bookstores. Students who take this class are expected to take the corresponding AP Exam at the end of the year.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: "C" or higher in Honors English 10 OR "B" or higher in English 10 in addition to a teacher recommendation

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION
(Can replace English 12)
4042
This Advanced Placement course offers ambitious students the opportunity to encounter college level work before graduation from high school. Its primary purpose is to prepare students for entry into Freshmen level college English literature courses, though a passing score on the Advanced Placement Test for Literature and Composition can earn a student college credit depending on the requirements of the individual college. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of fiction, including prose, poetry, and drama. Students will consider a work's structure, style, and themes as well as the author's use of language. Summer reading/writing assignments are required, and it is the responsibility of the student to obtain access to any texts that may be needed. Texts can be obtained through the public library, Amazon.com, or local bookstores. Students who take this class are expected to take the corresponding AP Exam at the end of the year.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: "C" or higher in AP Language and Composition OR "B" or higher in English 11 in addition to a teacher recommendation

ENGLISH 12 (GRADE 12)
4012
English/Language Arts 12 is a course that integrates real-world reading and writing for various purposes. Students will strengthen grammar/ mechanics and writing skills through a variety of forms such as cover letters, resumes, and research papers (i.e. informative and argumentative) and will strengthen reading skills through interacting with both informational and literary texts and supporting inferences with textual evidence. Students will also improve active listening, collaboration, and communication skills through small group and large group discussions and panel presentations. Students will keep a portfolio of all work completed in class which will be presented as a final reflection in front of a panel of judges prior to graduation.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

ENGLISH 12 CR (GRADE 12)

English 12 CR is a rigorous course designed for students within approximately 4-5 points of the acceptance score for college admission into a credit-bearing entry level English course. Engagement in this rigorous course of study will assist those identified students in attaining acceptable admissions scores for entrance into a credit-bearing freshman English course. In this course, students will be prepared for college and career by concentrating on composition and rhetoric as well as informational and literary texts. English 12 CR is also filled with opportunities for collaboration and discourse thus creating true learning communities within the classroom. Students will keep a portfolio of all work completed in class which will be presented as a final reflection in front of a panel of judges prior to graduation.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

ENGLISH 101-102 (DUAL CREDIT 12TH GRADE)
40121X
DUAL CREDIT CLASS WITH SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA COMMUNTIY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE. Students enrolling in this class may apply to Southern if they have a transcript showing a cumulative 3.0 grade point average (on a 4.0 scale) and have a score of at least 18 in English and a 17 in Reading on the ACT. Ten students must commit irrevocably for the class to be scheduled. SWVCTC provides a discount on tuition. Dual Credit English is a research and literature course that focuses on types of academic reading and discourse, including composition, critical reading, critical thinking, and critical analysis. A research paper is required each semester. Summer reading/writing assignments are required, and it is the responsibility of the student to obtain access to any texts that may be needed. Texts can be obtained through the public library, Amazon.com, or local bookstores. If a student fails to make at least a "C" first semester, they will not be allowed to enroll second semester.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters: (English 101 1st Semester (3 College Credit Hours) -English 102 2nd Semester (3 College Credit Hours)
SWVCTC Prerequisites: A score of 18 on the English component and a 17 on the Reading component of the ACT, a 3.0 cumulative GPA or higher
CRHS Prerequisites: "C" or higher in AP Language and Composition OR "B" or higher in English 11 in addition to a teacher recommendation
Both sets of prerequisites must be met in order to be enrolled in this class.

YEARBOOK
4071
Students who are assuming a position on yearbook's editorial board are eligible for this course. Students will perform specific duties outlined in the staff guidelines.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Permission of the teacher

LIBRARY
5911
This course involves practical experience in the library. Students are trained to use both paper and computer resources to help other students.
Credit: 0.5
Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites:

EAGLE'S NEST (11th or 12th grade)
7671
Students must apply for Eagle's Nest. They must have a 3.5 or better GPA.
Credit: 0.5
Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: Pre-Approval

LEADERSHIP (11th or 12th grade)
7651
Students must apply for Eagle's Nest. They must have a 3.5 or better GPA.
Credit: 0.5
Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: Pre-Approval

MATHEMATICS
MATH I (GRADE 9)
3012
The fundamental purpose of Mathematics I is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas, organized into units, deepen and extend understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena, and also by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

MATH I SUPPORT (GRADE 9)
3013
This course is intended for students who need more time to master the fundamental concepts of Math I. The fundamental purpose of Mathematics I is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas, organized into units, deepen and extend understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena and also by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

MATH II (GRADES 9-12)
3014
Math II will continue to formalize and extend the mathematics that the students has learned in the Math I classroom. The critical areas, organized into units, deepen and extend understanding of linear relationships in part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena, and also by applying linear models to data that extend a linear trend
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters;
Prerequisites:

CONCEPTUAL MATH (GR. 10-12)
3044
Conceptual Mathematics is a one-year course for students who have successfully completed the objectives for geometry. This course will include major topics from algebra and geometry and will extend these ideas to practical usage. Basic ideas of probability and statistics and the mathematics of finance will also be included. It is the purpose of this course to expose students to topics in mathematics that are relevant to any educated person. Full integration of graphing calculators and computer applications such as spreadsheets, database, and internet use, is essential to effectively master the objectives of this course. Conceptual math is not part of the college preparatory curriculum and is not recommended as meeting the baccalaureate admissions requirements.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Geometry and Algebra I
Pathway: Skilled

ALGEBRA II (GRADES 10-12)
3041
This area of study is an extension of Algebra I with an emphasis on understanding and use of algebraic structures and techniques. It includes quadratic equations, complex numbers, and systems of linear equations, inequalities, absolute values, matrices, and determinants.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry

TRIGONOMETRY (GRADES 11-12 Paired with Pre-Calculus)
3048
It develops an understanding of both triangular and circular functions with their properties and graphs. Trigonometric equations, inverse functions, polar coordinates, and complex numbers are covered.
Credit: 0.5
Duration: One Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II and Geometry


PRE-CALCULUS (GR. 11-12) (GRADES 11-12 Paired with Pre-Calculus)
3046
Pre-Calculus will extend students' knowledge of functions as well as provide preparation for a calculus course.
Credit: 0.5
Duration: One Semester
Prerequisites: "B" or better in Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS (GRADES 11-12)
3031AB
3031BC

This is a course that meets for a block both semesters for two credits. This is an Advanced Placement course that will receive honors credit. The course will cover differential and integral calculus. Topics covered will include epsilon-delta definitions and use, transcendental functions and differential equations. Students are required to take the AP exam at the conclusion of this course. The Lincoln County School system will pay for this exam. It is strongly recommended that 11th graders enrolled in this course already have a pre-calculus credit. Students enrolled in this course first semester, should take AP Calculus BC second semester.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Teacher Recommendation
Note: It is strongly recommended that juniors successfully complete trigonometry and/or pre-calculus before taking this course.

TRANSITION MATH FOR SENIORS
(GRADE 12 Only)
3052
This course is required of seniors in the professional pathway, or college-bound seniors in the skilled pathway, who do not meet mastery or above in the math subtest of WESTEST 2 in their junior year.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of 3 previous math classes.

MUSIC
Music is a fundamental way human beings create and communicate. The music program is designed as a comprehensive standard study of music that will allow students to become musically literate. Through music study, students also develop and refine skills in reading, writing, mathematics, and foreign language. They explore music as a science from a cultural/historical perspective. By making appropriate connections between music and other areas of the curriculum, students are able to strengthen their understanding of both music and other content areas. Upper level performance courses (Auditioned Choirs and Marching Band) give students performance experience similar to that of the professional musician and prepare the student for a lifetime of music making and enjoyment.

CHORUS I (GRADES 9-12)
3621
This course is an introductory level class. The course places emphasis upon developing basic music reading skills, the development of good vocal tone production, ensemble singing and to introduce students to major styles of music from the Renaissance to the present day. Performances, "during and outside of class", are a required part of this course. No previous experience necessary. This is a non-auditioned ensemble.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None


CHORUS II (GRADES 10-12)
3622

CHORUS III (GRADES 11-12)
3623

CHORUS IV (GRADE 12)
3624

Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Completion of the preceding Chorus level
This is a continuation of beginning chorus. Performances are a required part of this course. No previous experience necessary. No auditions necessary. No costumes.

Vocal Ensemble - Show Choir (Grades - 9-12)
3766
This is an upper level advanced choral performance ensemble open to all students. It is expected that these students have mastery of beginning and intermediate/advanced choir objectives. The course is designed to be a blend of ensemble singing with added staging and/or choreography. Admission is through audition/invitation only. Fees required for costumes. Outside of class time rehearsals and performances are part of the course requirements. Annual events include: Show Choir Competitions, Christmas and Spring Concerts, and other events as specified by the instructor.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful Audition and permission of the teacher

MARCHING BAND
3611 (Grade 9)
3612 (Grade 10)
3613 (Grade 11)
3614 (Grade 12)

The marching band is an upper level class open to all students who play a band instrument and are interested in performing at games, parades, and marching contests. OPEN TO ALL GRADES. Any auxiliary groups selected to perform with the marching band (such as flag corps or dance team) must take this class. Participants must be available for band rehearsals during the summer, including mandatory band camp, and after-school rehearsals through the year. Outside performances are included in grade evaluations. Students wishing to be placed in the 2011 competition show must attend band camp on designated weekdays during the summer. Fees may be required for dance team costumes.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: First Semester (Half-credit is not an option)
Prerequisites: Permission of the teacher

MUSIC HISTORY & APPRECIATION
(GRADES 10-12)
3746
This course helps to develop skills in reading and understanding music notation and explore the expressions and organization of musical ideas. Students will gain experience in performing, exploring, creating and relating different styles of music. Students study music as it relates to human experiences.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None


PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Regular physical activity that is performed on most days of the week reduces the risk of developing or dying from some of the leading causes of illness and death in the United States. Plus, learn activities that may interest you and could be used later as an adult to lengthen or increase your life span and improve your lifestyle.
A student must complete the course, "High School Physical Education," for graduation and it is a prerequisite for all electives. This course is recommended for the ninth or tenth grade. Electives are open to 10th, 11th, or 12th graders upon completion of the "High School Physical Education" course.

HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION
6609
This course is required for graduation, recommended for 9th and 10th grade students, and must be completed before enrollment in any physical education elective. This class is designed to assure that students experience and realize the benefits of fitness by participating in a sequenced plan of physical activity which introduces the following sports and units of study: Life Fitness, Conditioning and Weight Training, Leisure and Recreation, and Fitness and Conditioning.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None
OBJECTIVES:
Apply rules, strategies and proper behavioral practices for lifetime fitness, recreation, sports, and physical activity. Develop skills in a variety of individual and dual sports, team sports, recreational, rhythmic, and fitness activities. Analyze the relationship of physical activity/fitness to other components of wellness. Demonstrate an understanding of safety practices associated with physical activity. Analyze how drugs, tobacco, and alcohol affect physical performance.

SCIENCE
Three units of science are required for graduation. These include Physical Science, Biology and Chemistry. Students in the professional pathway are required to complete a fourth science. Physical Science will be taken by students in the ninth grade, and in the tenth grade students will take Biology. Eleventh grade students in the professional pathway will take Chemistry while those in the skilled pathway will take Conceptual Chemistry or Advanced Environmental Earth Science. Course descriptions indicate whether courses are classified as laboratory sciences as defined by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.
PHYSICAL SCIENCE (GRADE 9)
6011
Physical Science objectives continue the development of foundational knowledge in chemistry and physics. Laboratory investigations will be a major component of this course. This is a required course for students entering the 9th grade in the fall of 2008.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

BIOLOGY (GRADE 10)
6021
This is the required science course for 10th grade students (you may substitute AP Biology for this course with teacher/counselor/parent recommendation and appropriate qualifications). Students will build and expand their laboratory skills and experiences in the life sciences needed to prepare for college. This course meets the criteria for lab credit and is recognized by 4-year colleges as a laboratory course for college entrance.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

CHEMISTRY (GRADE 11)
6031
Chemistry is a study of the nature of matter and the naturally existing relationships between the types of matter. Fundamental mathematical skills, concepts and problem solving skills are taught. Laboratory equipment, procedures and experimentation are emphasized. This course counts as laboratory science credit for college admission and should be taken by all eleventh grade students in the professional pathway.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Physical Science

PHYSICS (GRADES 11-12)
6041
Physics is intended for students planning on college science majors and includes concepts and experimentation in measurement, motion, forces, fluids/pressure, heat, and thermodynamics. This course counts as laboratory science credit for college admission.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semester
Prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra II

ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCE (GRADES 11-12)
6201
Earth Science incorporates fundamentals of geology, biology, chemistry, physics, meteorology and ecology in the study of the environment. The impact of economic, political and social pressures on environmental issues is emphasized. This course counts as laboratory science credit for college admission.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters

HUMAN ANATOMY
(GRADES 11 and 12)
6103
Human Anatomy and Physiology is a study of the human body systems including cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, reproductive, and endocrine and immune systems. A research project is required for this course. This course counts as laboratory science credit for college admission.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of biology or conceptual chemistry

SOCIAL STUDIES,
WORLD STUDIES TO 1900 (GR. 9)
7010
This study of the world emphasizes the historic, geographic, political, and social structure of various cultural regions of the world from the dawn of civilization to the interdependent world of the 20th century.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

U.S. TO 1900 (GRADE 10)
7009
This program of study follows the evolution of the constitution as a living document and the role of participatory democracy in the development of a rapidly changing technological society. This study of the United States is an examination of the formative years from the Pre-Columbian civilizations to its transformation as a dominant political and economic influence in the world. Special emphasis is placed on how the challenges of settling expansive and widely differing environments were met by a diverse population.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY

(Can be substituted for 20th/21st Century Studies) (Grades 11-12)
7046
This course can be substituted for US to 1900. This course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. It offers an in-depth survey of U.S. History from discovery and settlement of the new world to the present. ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAMINATION PAID BY THE DISTRICT IS REQUIRED. THIS IS AN ELECTIVE COURSE OPEN TO GRADES 11 AND 12.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Permission of the teacher; AP World History (for 10th grade students)

20TH/21ST CENTURY STUDIES
(GRADE 11)
7011
The focus of this course is an identification and study of the interaction of geographic, political, economic, and historical factors. Such factors provide students a framework to examine and appreciate the changing nature of societies and the increasing interdependency of the United States and the world. Students will contrast and evaluate past and present world concerns and hypothesize about problems and solutions for the future. Students will realize the importance of well-informed citizens in a diverse society and their place in the democratic process.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT (GRADE 12)
7031
Responsible participatory citizenship, an understanding of the workings of our government and sound financial literacy are essential to the preservation and improvement of American constitutional democracy. Students rely on knowledge attained and skills developed in their previous courses of United States and World Studies as a foundation for the Civics/Government course. In this course, students develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions to engage in civic life, financial literacy, politics and government and analyze the personal, political and economic roles of responsible citizens in American democracy. Students will explain and give examples of the traits of public character, of informed effective and responsible citizens, and demonstrate through explanation and example how responsible citizens interact, monitor and influence public policy.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

PSYCHOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY (GRADES 10-12)
734112

732122

THEATER

THEATER I (GRADES 9-12)
3801
This course is designed to provide the student with further exploration of the art of acting and the production of a play. Participants are expected to perform for a variety of audiences.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

THEATER II (GRADES 10-12)
3802
This course is designed to provide the student with further exploration of the art of acting and the production of a play. Participants are expected to perform for a variety of audiences.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Theater I

THEATER III (GRADES 11-12)
3803
This course will be held in conjunction with Theater II. These advance students will be provided with a variety of in-depth, hands on acting experiences before a variety of audiences.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Theater II and permission of the teacher

THEATER IV (GRADE 12)
3804
This course may be held in conjunction with Theater III. These students will have the opportunity to demonstrate the artistic discipline to collaborate with others to rehearse and perform either formal or informal theater works. Students will also be given the opportunity to write and/or direct either a short formal production or a short informal production.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Theater III and permission of the teacher.

STAGECRAFT (GRADES 9-12)

3859
Stagecraft courses are designed to promote students' experience and skill development in one or more aspects of theatrical production, but concentrate on stagecraft (such as lighting, set construction, stage management, and so on.) Stagecraft I focus primarily on the student education of the theatre and its tools of production. This course will also include the study of basic audio and visual recording technology. Students will be involved in school plays, concerts, and miscellaneous presentations.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters (Yearlong course; half-credit is not an option)
Prerequisites: Students must be available for after school practices and evening performances. Permission of the teacher.

WORLD LANGUAGES
Colleges recommend/require at least 2 years of high school foreign language study. However, some universities are now requiring 3 years. It is a student's responsibility to see his/her counselor on this matter. Also, it is recommended for students who will be working with the public, especially in the fields of medicine, public service, tourism and for students who wish to travel. Students in the Professional Pathway must take 2 years of the same foreign language.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE IS A RECOMMENDED ELECTIVE IN ALL CLUSTER AREAS.

SPANISH I (GRADES 9-12)
5661
This introduction to the Spanish language and culture will focus upon the skills of reading, speaking, listening, and writing in Spanish. Understanding cultural differences and similarities is an inherent part of the course. There will be extensive use of computer programs, CD's, and videos.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None; a "C" or above in English is highly recommended

SPANISH II (GRADES 9-12)
5662
This course is a continuation of Spanish I, with further emphasis on advanced grammar, conversation, reading, writing, and the study of additional aspects of Hispanic life. There will be use of computer programs, CD's, and videos.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish I

SPANISH III (GR. 10-12)

5663
This honors level course gives students the opportunity to apply the advanced skills already learned in listening, speaking, reading and writing Spanish. This course also emphasizes the study of Hispanic culture. There will be use of computer programs, CD's, and videos.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish II

JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICER'S TRAINING CORPS
LEADERSHIP EDUCATION AND TRAINING I (JROTC)
7645
The semester program of instruction (POI) teaches drill and ceremonies, leadership, first aid, basic map reading, oral communication, marksmanship, physical fitness and other self-developing subjects. Military history and citizenship are also taught. Desired course outcomes are to develop in each cadet: (1) an appreciation of the ethical values and principles which underlie good citizenship - to include integrity, responsibility, and respect for constituted authority; (2) the ability to think logically and communicate effectively; (3) leadership ability, and (4) physical fitness. A uniform is issued and worn periodically. Cadets may be members of the color guard, rifle or drill team and participate in parades and ceremonies as well as community service and school projects. The JROTC mission is "to motivate young people to be good citizens." JROTC classes do not obligate the student to any military service nor is any attempt made to recruit cadets into the armed forces. However, successful completion of JROTC LET II and III can respectively enable the cadet to enter the armed forces at pay grades E-2.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

LEADERSHIP EDUCATION AND TRAINING II (JROTC II)
7646
This course is a continuation of LET I, which is a prerequisite. A more in-depth study of LET I subjects is conducted. Most LET II cadets hold junior leadership positions in the cadet battalion.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of LET I

LEADERSHIP EDUCATION AND TRAINING III (JROTC III)
7647
Cadets must have successfully completed LET II and be approved by the Senior Army Instructor (SAI). Cadets will actually apply their leadership and management skills. Most LET III cadets hold mid-level leadership positions in the cadet battalion.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of LET II

LEADERSHIP EDUCATION AND TRAINING IV (JROTC IV)
7648
Cadets must have successfully completed LET III and be approved by the SAI. Emphasis is placed on leadership duties and responsibilities. Cadets may act as class assistant instructors for drill and ceremonies and as assistant class instructors for map reading, first aid and marksmanship. In lieu of or in addition to regular classroom academic instruction, cadets may be assigned self-paced study, suggested readings, and special assignments. Most LET IV cadets hold senior leadership positions in the cadet battalion. V
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Successful completion of LET III

BUSINESS/MARKETING
CAREER MAJORS OFFERED

1401 Accounting Principles I
This course is designed to develop student understanding and skills in such areas as the basic principles, concepts and practices of the accounting cycle. Journalizing, posting and analyzing of financial statements as well as banking and payroll procedures are included. The importance of ethics and confidentiality, as well as, an introduction to careers and types of business ownership are incorporated. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organizations, DECA or FBLA. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools and skill sets.

Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

1403 Accounting Principles II
This course is designed to develop student understanding and skills in such areas as advanced accounting procedures and techniques utilizing both manual and computer-based accounting. There is a strong emphasis on problem solving, analysis and financial decision-making. Students study the advanced principles, concepts and practices of the accounting cycle and partnerships, corporations, cost accounting, inventory and tax accounting. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organizations, DECA or FBLA. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools and skill sets.

Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Accounting I

1439 Business and Marketing Essentials
This course is designed to develop student understanding and skills in such areas as business law, communication skills, customer relations, economics, emotional intelligence, financial analysis, human resources management, information management, marketing, operations, professional development and strategic management. Students acquire knowledge of fundamental business activities and factors affecting business, develop verbal and written communication skills, use information literacy skills, utilize job-seeking strategies and participate in career planning. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organizations, DECA or FBLA. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools and skill sets.

Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

BUSINESS COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
(GRADES 9-12)
1411
This is part of the WV EDGE Program. This area of study is designed to provide the learner with the opportunity to understand and apply integrated software to intermediate business applications. The students will be introduced to database, word processing, graphics, spreadsheet, power point, and presentations software packages.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

DESKTOP PUBLISHING
(GRADES 11-12)
1429
This course will introduce students to a variety of ways that people use tools and resources to communicate. Students will explore various applications in desktop publishing through hands-on activities and experiences which may include brochures, pamphlets, newsletters, letterheads, tables (graphs, charts, etc.), memos, forms, advertisements, banners, business cards, web pages, etc.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Business Computer Applications I

DIGITAL IMAGING AND MULTI-MEDIA I (GRADES 11)
1431
This course will introduce students to the basics of producing digital images for multimedia purposes. Students will explore various methods of producing images through hands-on activities and experiences which will include: operating a digital camera, using imaging software to improve photos or to create special effects, creating simple animations, manipulating video images, and producing multimedia images.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None

1455 Web Page Publishing
This course is designed to develop student understanding and skills in such areas as Web page design including using Web page development software, creating page layouts, adding images and frames, creating elements and components, creating tables, managing files, publishing to the Internet, creating hyperlinks, organizing tasks and using codes (markup languages). Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organizations, DECA or FBLA. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools and skill sets.

Credit: 1.0
Duration: 2 Semester
Prerequisites: Pre-Approval

VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
The Automotive Technology concentration focuses on careers that will build a knowledge base and technical skills in all aspects of the automotive industry. Students will have the opportunity to acquire hours towards certification and be exposed to skills to develop positive work ethics.

FUNDAMENTALS OF AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
1631E1
This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills as they relate to the field of Automotive Technology. In the Fundamentals of Automotive Technology class areas of study include career opportunities and practices, basic safety, tool and equipment, measuring tools and equipment, automotive specifications, electrical system basics, battery service, wheel and tire service, cooling and lubrication systems, and student organizations.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Semester; 1ST Semester - 1st Year
Prerequisites: None
Pathway: Skilled

BRAKES
1625E1
Brake Systems will continue to build student skill sets in areas such as diagnosis and repair of hydraulic systems, diagnosis and repair of drum brakes, diagnosis and repair of disc brakes, power assist systems, and antilock brake systems. Students will comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with proper ventilation, handling, storage, and disposal of brake components.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 2nd Semester - 1st Year
Prerequisites: Automotive Fundamentals
Pathway: Skilled

SUSPENSION AND STEERING DIAGNOSIS
1637E1
Suspension and Steering Diagnosis will continue to build student skill sets in areas such as diagnosis and repair of steering systems, diagnosis and repair of front suspension systems, diagnosis and repair of rear suspension systems, miscellaneous suspension and steering systems, and diagnosis and adjust wheel alignment.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 1st Semester - 2nd Year
Prerequisites: Automotive Fundamentals, Brakes
Pathway: Skilled

BASIC ENGINE CONCEPTS
1623E2
PREREQUISITES: STUDENT MUST HAVE A 9TH GRADE READING AND MATH LEVEL AND BE ABLE TO APPLY BASIC PROBLEM-SOLVING SKILLS. STUDENTS MUST HAVE GOOD HAND/EYE COORDINATION AND MUST BE WILLING TO WORK IN A GARAGE-TYPE AREA.
Basic Engine Concepts will continue to build student skill sets in areas such as general engines, diagnosis of cylinder head and valve train, diagnosis and repair of engine block, and diagnosis and repair of lubrication and cooling systems.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 2nd Semester - 2nd Year
Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Automotive, Brakes, Suspension and Steering
Pathway: Skilled

ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS (10th Grade Elective)
1627E1
This course will introduce students to basic electrical/electronic systems operations and parts identification. After completing the course students will be prepared for entry level positions and be able to participate in Skills USA. Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters;
Pathway: Skilled

CARPENTRY
The Carpentry concentration focuses on careers that will build a knowledge base and technical skills in all aspects of the carpentry industry. Learners will be exposed to a broad range of construction careers and foundation knowledge including basic safety; plan reading; use of tools and equipment; basic rigging; and how to employ positive work ethics in their careers. Students will have the opportunity to earn NCCER certification for each skill set mastered.

CARPENTRY I
1842E1
This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills of the carpentry industry. Carpentry I begins with the NCCER Core curriculum which is a prerequisite to all Level I completions. The students will complete modules in Basic Safety; Introduction to Construction Math; Introduction to Hand Tools; Introduction to Power Tools; Introduction to Construction Drawings; Basic Rigging; Basic Communication Skills; Basic Employability Skills; and Introduction to Materials Handling. Students will then begin developing skill sets related to the fundamentals of Carpentry such as Orientation to the Trade; Building Materials, Fasteners, and Adhesives; and Hand and Power Tools.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 1st Year - 1st Semester
Prerequisites: Ninth grade reading and math levels
Pathway: Skilled

CARPENTRY II
1843E2
Carpentry II will continue to build student skill sets in areas such as Reading Plans and Elevations; Floor Systems, Wall and Ceiling Framing; Roof Framing; Introduction to Concrete, Reinforcing Materials, and Forms; Windows and Exterior Doors; Basic Stair Layout.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 1st Year - 2nd Semester
Prerequisites: Carpentry I
Pathway: Skilled

CARPENTRY III
1844E1
Carpentry III will continue to build student skill sets in areas of Commercial Drawings; Roofing Applications; Thermal and Moisture Protection; and Exterior Finishing. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 2nd Year - 1st Semester
Prerequisites: Carpentry II
Pathway: Skilled

CARPENTRY IV
1845E2
Carpentry IV will continue to build student skill sets in areas of Cold-Formed Steel Framing; Drywall Installation; Drywall Finishing; Doors and Door Hardware; Suspended Ceilings; Window, Door, Floor, and Ceiling Trim; Cabinet Installation; and Cabinet Fabrication. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 2nd Year - 2nd Semester
Prerequisites: Carpentry III
Pathway: Skilled

BLUEPRINT READING FOR CONSTRUCTION
1822E1
This course introduces students to the basic skills of blueprint reading. Students will understand the various forms of blueprints, terms, symbols, and dimensions. Job seeking skills, real world application opportunities, and safety are also incorporated into this course.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semester
Prerequisites: None

FUNDAMENTALS OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION (10TH GRADE ONLY)
1827E1
Designed to offer the following concepts and skills: Identification of basic hand tools and their safe and appropriate use, identification of basic power tools and their safe and appropriate use, identification of basic safety equipment procedures and their appropriate use, proper and safe use of ladders and scaffolds, fundamentals of foundation and floor plans and basic framing materials.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: None


ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY
UPON COMPLETION OF THIS 1080-HOUR PROGRAM, THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO TAKE THE WV STATE FIRE MARSHAL'S TEST FOR THE STATE ELECTRICAL JOURNEYMAN'S LICENSE
The Electrical Technician concentration focuses on careers that will build a knowledge base and technical skills in all aspects of the Electrical Trades industry. Students will have the opportunity to earn NCCER certification for each skill set mastered and be exposed to skills to develop positive work ethics.

ELECTRICAL TRADES I
1756E1
This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills of the Electrical Trades industry. Electrical Trades I begins with the NCCER Core curriculum which is a prerequisite to all Level I completions. The students will complete modules in Basic Safety; Introduction to Construction Math; Introduction to Hand Tools; Introduction to Power Tools; Introduction to Construction Drawings; Basic Rigging; Basic Communication Skills; Basic Employability Skills; and Introduction to Materials Handling. Students will then begin developing skill sets related to the fundamentals of Electricity such as Orientation to the Electrical Trade; and Electrical Safety.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 1st Year - 1st Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra I
Pathway: Skilled

ELECTRICAL TRADES II
1757E2
Electrical Trades II will continue to build student skill sets in areas such as Introduction to Electrical Circuits; Electrical Theory; Introduction to the National Electrical Code ®; Device Boxes; Hand Bending; Raceways and Fittings; Conductors and Cables; Basic Electrical Construction Drawings; Residential Electrical Services; and Electrical Test Equipment.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 1st Year - 2nd Semester
Prerequisites: Electrical Trades I
Pathway: Skilled

ELECTRICAL TRADES III
1758E1
Electrical Trades III will continue to build student skill sets in areas of Alternating Current; Motors: Theory and Application; Electric Lighting; and Conduit Bending.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 2nd Year -1st Semester
Prerequisites: Electrical Trades II
Pathway: Skilled


ELECTRICAL TRADES IV
1759E2

Electrical Trades IV will continue to build student skill sets in areas of Pull and Junction Boxes; Conductor Installations; Cable Tray; Conductor Terminations and Splices; Grounding and Bonding; Circuit Breakers and Fuses; and Control Systems and Fundamental Concepts.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 2nd Year - 2nd Semester
Prerequisites: Electrical Trades III
Pathway: Skilled

ELECTRICAL BLUE PRINT READING
1762E1
This course introduces students to the basic skills of blueprint reading. Students will understand the various forms of blueprints, terms, symbols, and dimensions. Job seeking skills, real world application opportunities, and safety are also incorporated into this course.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: Electrical Trades III
Pathway: Skilled

ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY
The Electronic Systems Technician concentration focuses on careers that will build a knowledge base and technical skills in all aspects of the Electronic Trades industry. Students will have the opportunity to earn NCCER certification for each skill set mastered and be exposed to skills to develop positive work ethics.


Electronics Systems I (A+ Computer Repair)
1666E1
This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills of the Electrical Trades industry. Electrical Trades I begins with the NCCER Core curriculum which is a prerequisite to all Level I completions. The students will complete modules in Basic Safety; Introduction to Construction Math; Introduction to Hand Tools; Introduction to Power Tools; Introduction to Construction Drawings; Basic Rigging; Basic Communication Skills; Basic Employability Skills; and Introduction to Materials Handling. Students will then begin developing skill sets related to the fundamentals of Electronics such as Introduction to the Trade; and Wood and Masonry Construction Methods. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organizations, WV SkillsUSA. The West Virginia Standards for Global 21 Learning include the following components: Global 21 Content, Literacy and Numeracy, Entrepreneurship, and Technology Standards. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools, and content standards and objectives.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester
Prerequisites: None
Pathway: Skilled

Electronics Systems II (A+ Computer Repair)
1667E1
Electronics Systems II will continue to build student skill sets in areas such as Concrete and Steel Construction Methods; Pathways and Spaces; Craft Related Mathematics; Hand Bending Conduit; Introduction to the National Electrical Code®; and Low-Voltage Cabling. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organizations, WV SkillsUSA. The West Virginia Standards for Global 21 Learning include the following components: Global 21 Content, Literacy and Numeracy, Entrepreneurship, and Technology Standards. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools, and content standards and objectives.
Credit: 1
Duration: One Semester
Prerequisites: Electronic Systems I
Pathway: Skilled

Electronics Systems III (Network +1)
1668E1
Electronics Systems III will continue to build student skill sets in areas of DC Circuits; AC Circuits; Switching Devices and Timers; Semiconductors and Integrated Circuits; and Test Equipment. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organizations, WV SkillsUSA. The West Virginia Standards for Global 21 Learning include the following components: Global 21 Content, Literacy and Numeracy, Entrepreneurship, and Technology Standards. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools, and content standards and objectives.
Credit: 1
Duration: One Semester
Prerequisites: Electronic Systems II
Pathway: Skilled

Electronics Systems IV (Network +2)

1669E1
Electronics Systems IV will continue to build student skill sets in areas of Introduction to Electrical Drawings; Introduction to Codes and Standards; Cable Selection; Wire and Cable Terminations; and Power Quality and Grounding. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organizations, WV SkillsUSA. The West Virginia Standards for Global 21 Learning include the following components: Global 21 Content, Literacy and Numeracy, Entrepreneurship, and Technology Standards. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools, and content standards and objectives.
Credit: 1
Duration: One Semester
Prerequisites: Electronic Systems III
Pathway: Skilled

PRO-START (COOKING)
RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT ESSENTIALS (Formerly PROSTART I B)
(GRADES 10-12)
1014E1
This course is designed to focus management essentials in the restaurant industry, guest service, food production, and career exploration and pursuit. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Students in these courses are required to have 100% mastery of safety and sanitation testing. This is the second of four courses in the ProStart Restaurant Management curriculum.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 1st Year - 2nd Semester

ADVANCED PRINCIPLES IN FOOD PRODUCTION (Formerly PROSTART II A)
(GRADES 10-12)
1019E1
This course is designed to examine advanced food production, nutrition, and cost control. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts.
This is the third of four courses in the ProStart Restaurant Management curriculum.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 2nd Year - 1st Semester

THE RESTAURANT PROFESSIONAL (Formerly PROSTART II B) (GRADES 10-12)
1020E1
This course is designed to provide content related global cuisine, sustainability, desserts and baked goods, and marketing. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Students in these courses are required to have 100% mastery of safety and sanitation testing. This is the final course in the ProStart Restaurant Management curriculum.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 2nd Year - 2nd Semester

CULINARY NUTRITION AND THE MENU
(GRADES 10-12)
1017E0
Nutrition basics and the guidelines used for foodservice meal planning are covered in Culinary Nutrition and the Menu. Dietary guidelines and special dietary needs will be used in modifying menu choices. Students will apply healthy cooking techniques to prepare food.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters

GRAPHIC DESIGN

The Graphic Design concentration focuses on careers in a number of occupations requiring creative design such as web page designer, layout artists, logo designer, flash designer, illustrator, Photoshop artist, and a multimedia designer.

FUNDAMENTALS OF GRAPHIC DESIGN
1857E
This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills for all courses in the Graphic Design concentration. Areas of study include equipment and materials, computer skills, copyright, design principles, customer specifications, and student organizations. Emphasis will be placed on personal and professional ethics, and students will explore a variety of career opportunities.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 1st Year - 2nd Semester
Prerequisites: None. It is recommended that the Graphic Design Program be taken in sequence: 1851, 1857, 1861, and 1859.
Pathway: Skilled

FUNDAMENTALS OF ILLUSTRATION
1851E1
This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills necessary for all courses in the Graphic Design concentration. Areas of study include media applications, perspective, drawing and painting, and student organizations. Students will demonstrate knowledge and technical expertise in illustration.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 1st Year - 1st Semester
Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Illustration and Fundamentals of Graphic Design and Production. It is recommended that courses be taken in sequence: 1851, 1857, 1861, and 1859.
Pathway: Skilled
GRAPHIC DESIGN APPLICATIONS
1859E1
This introduces the student to basic advertising concepts and advanced layout procedures. Areas of study include demographics, mechanical preparation, vector and raster graphics, and student organizations. Students will demonstrate knowledge and technical expertise in the mechanical preparation of design projects.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 2nd Year - 1st Semester
Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Illustration
Pathway: Skilled

Fundamentals of Desktop Publishing
1855E1
This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills in desktop publishing. Areas of study include production skills, design projects, portfolio development, and student organizations. Students will demonstrate knowledge and technical expertise in page layout. Emphasis will be placed on personal and professional ethics, and students will explore a variety of career opportunities. Students will utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in laboratory activities to develop an understanding of course concepts, and teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction related to graphic design occupations. Safety instruction is integrated into all activities. Students are encouraged to become active members of Skills USA for additional co-curricular opportunities that enhance student achievement, develop student leadership, and support experiential learning. The West Virginia Standards for 21st Century Learning include the following components: 21st Century Content Standards and 21st Century Learning Skills and Technology Tools. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools, and content standards and objectives.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters - all year.
Prerequisites: None
Pathway: Skilled

Fundamentals of Computer Graphics
1853E1
This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills necessary to create and manipulate computer graphics. Areas of study include production, design projects, intermediate processes, digital cameras, animation, and student organizations. Students will demonstrate knowledge and technical expertise in digital editing. Emphasis will be placed on personal and professional ethics, and students will explore a variety of career opportunities. Students will utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in laboratory activities to develop an understanding of course concepts, and teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction related to graphic design occupations. Safety instruction is integrated into all activities. Students are encouraged to become active members of Skills USA for additional co-curricular opportunities that enhance student achievement, develop student leadership, and support experiential learning. The West Virginia Standards for 21st Century Learning include the following components: 21st Century Content Standards and 21st Century Learning Skills and Technology Tools. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools, and content standards and objectives.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters - all year.
Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Illustration
Pathway: Skilled

ILLUSTRATION
1861E1
This course introduces the student to advanced topics in illustration. Areas of study include color theory, proportion, portfolios, and student organizations. Students will demonstrate knowledge and technical expertise in advanced illustration techniques.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 2nd Year - 2nd Semester
Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Graphic Design and Production, Advanced Illustration, Fundamentals of Illustration
Pathway: Skilled

HEALTH SCIENCE EDUCATION
NOTE: All classes under this heading DO NOT substitute for required health credits or science credits.
NOTE:
(1) All classes involving a clinical rotation will require purchase of uniforms, a lab jacket, proper shoes (such as white tennis shoes), a watch with a second hand, and other materials as required by the particular course.

FOUNDATIONS OF HEALTH SCIENCE
(Formerly Fundamentals of Healthcare)
(Grades 9-12)
0711E1
This course is designed to allow instructional content to focus on basic medical terminology, growth and development, nutrition, health maintenance practices and healthcare delivery systems. It is designed to provide the student with knowledge and technical skills required for infection control and the prevention of disease transmission, CPR and First Aid. Students will be provided with the opportunity to acquire certification in these areas. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 1st Year - 1st Semester
Prerequisites: 9th grade or higher reading level.

ADVANCED PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH SCIENCE
(Formerly Concepts of Healthcare)
(Grades 10-12)
0715E1
Instructional content will focus on healthcare safety, environmental safety processes and procedures, ethical and legal responsibilities and mathematical computations. Medical terminology and the reinforcement, expansion and enhancement of biology content specific to diseases and disorders are an integral part of the course. Instruction will incorporate project and problem based healthcare practices and procedures to demonstrate the importance of these skills. Students will develop basic technical skills required for all health career specialties including patient privacy, communication, teamwork and occupational safety and be provided with opportunities to obtain certifications in HIPPA/Data Privacy and health care safety.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One semesters; 1st Year - 2nd Semester
Prerequisites: 9th grade or higher reading level
CLINICAL SPEACIALTY I
(Formerly Clinical Concepts)
(Grades 10-12)
0789E1
This course is designed to allow the student to choose a career work-based experience from the following specializations:
Select 1: Home Health Aide (A) Certified Nursing Assistant (B) Certified Patient Care Technician (C) ECG Certified Technician (D) Certified Health Unit Coordinator (E) Certified Phlebotomy Technician

Upon successful completion of the prerequisite courses in the Health Science Education concentration, students will be provided the opportunity in Clinical Specialty I to participate in a work-based clinical experience. Students choose a health career specialty for in-depth study and must complete a minimum of 55-100 hours in an applicable clinical rotation. Instruction is guided by career-specific content standards and objectives that must be mastered before students are eligible to attain established credentials and/or industry validation. Within this course, students focus upon employability skills and career development, and apply healthcare information technology and technical skills. Instruction will incorporate project and problem-based healthcare practices and procedures to demonstrate the criticality of these skills. Due to healthcare industry standards, exemplary attendance is mandatory. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organization, HOSA. The West Virginia Standards for Global 21 Learning include the following components: Global 21 Content, Literacy and Numeracy, Entrepreneurship and Technology Standards. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools and content standards and objectives.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One semester; 2nd Year - 1st Semester
Prerequisites: 9th grade or higher reading level;

CLINICAL SPEACIALTY II
(Formerly Diversified Clinical Applications)
(Grades 10-12)
0790E1
This course is designed to allow the student to choose a career work-based experience from the following specializations:
Select 1: Patient Care Technician ((G) Pre-Pharmacy Technician (H) Veterinary Science (I) Physical Therapy Aide (J) Sports Trainer (K) Advanced Health Seminar (L) Certified Health Unit Coordinator (M) Family Caregiver (N)
Upon successful completion of the prerequisite courses in the Health Science Education concentration, students will be provided the opportunity in Clinical Specialty II to participate in a work-based clinical experience. Students choose a health career specialty for in-depth study and must complete a minimum of 55-100 hours in an applicable clinical rotation. Instruction is guided by career-specific content standards and objectives that must be mastered before students are eligible to attain established credentials and/or industry validation. Within this course, students focus upon employability skills and career development, and apply healthcare information technology and technical skills. Instruction will incorporate project and problem-based healthcare practices and procedures to demonstrate the criticality of these skills. Due to healthcare industry standards, exemplary attendance is mandatory.
Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organization, HOSA. The West Virginia Standards for Global 21 Learning include the following components: Global 21 Content, Literacy and Numeracy, Entrepreneurship and Technology Standards. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools and content standards and objectives.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One semester; 2nd Year - 2nd Semester
Prerequisites: 9th grade or higher reading level;

PHLEBOTOMIST (Grade 12)
0825E1
Instructional content will focus on performing laboratory duties requiring accuracy, timeliness and documentation. The student will be able to function in the laboratory setting utilizing these skills. This course will enhance the student's knowledge of safety procedures as they relate to phlebotomy. They will be provided with the knowledge and skills necessary in maintaining the standard procedures required for a laboratory. Legal and ethical issues to consider in the profession are an integral part of this course. The phlebotomist must be able to recognize appropriate methods for analyzing specimens. In this course the student will learn these methods in collecting and processing the specimen to be analyzed. This externship is designed to provide students with hands-on experience in a clinical, physician's office or laboratory setting. They are required to complete 120 hours in the externship in order to receive credit for the course.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters
Prerequisites: 9th grade or higher reading level; higher level math, higher level science, Foundations of Health Science with an 80% completion grade and Advanced Principles of Health Science with an 80% completion grade.

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (Grades 10-12)
0721E1
Through the study of medical terminology, the student will be introduced to the language of medicine. Students will gain an understanding of basic elements, rules of building and analyzing medical words, and medical terms associated with the human body. Utilizing a systems approach, the student will define, interpret, and pronounce medical terms relating to structure and function, pathology, diagnosis, clinical procedures, oncology, and pharmacology. In addition to medical terms, common abbreviations applicable to each system will be interpreted.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters;
Prerequisites: 9th grade or higher reading level

Exploring Health Professions (Grades 10)
0700E1
Through the study of medical terminology, the student will be introduced to the language of medicine. Students will gain an understanding of basic elements, rules of building and analyzing medical words, and medical terms associated with the human body. Utilizing a systems approach, the student will define, interpret, and pronounce medical terms relating to structure and function, pathology, diagnosis, clinical procedures, oncology, and pharmacology. In addition to medical terms, common abbreviations applicable to each system will be interpreted.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters;
Prerequisites: 9th grade or higher reading level

WELDING TECHNOLOGY

The Welding concentration focuses on careers that will build a knowledge base and technical skills in all aspects of the Welding industry. Students will have the opportunity to earn both NCCER certification and the WV Welding Certification for each skill set mastered and be exposed to skills to develop positive work ethics.

WELDING I
1862E1
This course is designed to introduce the student to the knowledge base and technical skills of the Welding industry. Welding I begins with the NCCER Core curriculum which is a prerequisite to all Level I completions. The students will complete modules in Basic Safety; Introduction to Construction Math; Introduction to Hand Tools; Introduction to Power Tools; Introduction to Construction Drawings; Basic Rigging; Basic Communication Skills; Basic Employability Skills; and Introduction to Materials Handling. Students will then begin developing skill sets in the fundamentals of Welding such as Welding Safety; Oxyfuel Cutting; and Plasma Arc Cutting.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 1st Year - 1st Semester
Prerequisites: None

WELDING II
1863E01
Welding II will continue to build student skill sets in areas of Air Carbon Arc Cutting and Gouging; Base Metal Preparation; Weld Quality; SMAW-Equipment and Setup; Shielded Metal Arc Electrodes; SMAW-Beads and Fillet Welds; Joint Fit Up and Alignment; SMAW-Groove Welds with Backing; and SMAW-Open V-Groove Welds.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 1st Year - 2nd Semester
Prerequisites: Welding I

WELDING III
1864E1
Welding III will continue to build student skill sets in areas of Welding Symbols; Reading Welding Detail Drawings; Physical Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of Metals; Preheating and Post heating of Metals; GMAW and FCAW-Equipment and Filler Metals; and GMAW and FCAW-Plate. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 2nd Year - 1st Semester
Prerequisites: Welding II

WELDING IV
1865E1
Welding IV will continue to build student skill sets in areas of GTAW-Equipment and Filler Metals; and GTAW-Plate. Students utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: One Semester; 2nd Year - 2nd Semester
Prerequisites: Welding III

ORNAMENTAL WELDING
1982E1
This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills for concepts in the Ornamental Metal Work. Areas of study include measurement, metal layout and bending, operation of the drill press, band saw, and the iron worker. Emphasis will be placed on career exploration, job seeking skills, and personal and professional ethics. Safety instruction is integrated into all activities. Students will utilize problem solving techniques and participate in laboratory activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Students are encouraged to become active members of SkillsUSA for additional co-curricular opportunities that enhance student achievement, develop student leadership, and support experiential learning.
Credit: 1.0
Duration: Two Semesters

ARC WELDING
1981E1
This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills for concepts in the Arc Welding processes. Areas of study include SMAW, GMAW, FCAW, and GTAW. Emphasis will be placed on career exploration, job seeking skills, and personal and professional ethics. Safety instruction is integrated into all activities. Students will utilize problem-solving techniques and participate in laboratory activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Students are encouraged to become active members of SkillsUSA for additional co-curricular opportunities that enhance student achievement, develop student leadership, and support experiential learning
Credit: 1.0
Duration: 2 Semesters; 2nd Year - 2nd Semester

 

 

 

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